Croatia offers a unique combination of breathtaking natural beauty and outstanding architecture.

This is the List of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Croatia:

Plitvice Lakes National Park

Over time, water has flown over the naturallimestone and chalk, creating natural dams which in turn have created a series of connecting lakes, waterfalls and caves. The nearby forests are home to bears, wolves and many rare bird species.

Historical Complex of Split with the Palace of Diocletian

The palace was built by the Roman emperor Diocletianat the turn of the fourth century AD, and later served as the basis of the city of Split. A cathedral was built in the Middle Ages inside the ancient mausoleum, along with churches, fortifications, Gothic and Renaissance palaces. The Baroque style makes up the rest of the area.

Old City of Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik became a prosperous Maritime Republic during the Middle Ages, it became the only eastern Adriatic city-statec to rival Venice. Supported by its wealth and skilled diplomacy, the city achieved a remarkable level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Historic city of Trogir

Trogir’s rich culture was created under the influence of old Greeks, Romans, and Venetians. It is the best-preserved Romanesque-Gothic complex not only in the Adriatic, but in all of Central Europe. Trogir’s medieval core, surrounded by walls, comprises a preserved castle and tower and a series of dwellings and palaces from the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Cathedral of Saint James

The cathedral is a triple-nave basilica with three apses and a dome (32 m high inside) and is also one of the most important Renaissance architectural monuments in the eastern Adriatic.

Episcopal Complex of the Euphrasian Basilica in the Historic Centre of Poreč

The episcopal complex, with its striking mosaics dating back to the 6th century, is one of the best examples of early Byzantine art and architecture in the Mediterranean region and the world. It includes the basilica itself, a sacristy, a baptistery and the bell tower of the nearby archbishop’s palace.

Stari Grad on Hvar Plain

The Stari Grad Plain is an agricultural landscape that was set up by the ancient Greek colonists in the 4th century BC, and remains in use today. The plain is generally still in its original form. The ancient layout has been preserved by careful maintenance of the stone walls over 24 centuries.

Stećci Medieval Tombstones Graveyards

Stećak or the medieval tombstones are the monolith stone monuments found in the regions of the present Bosnia and Herzegovina, parts of Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro. The available sources suggest that they appear from the second half of the 12th century, then last through the 13th century and are intensively made and decorated in the 14th and 15th centuries. But in the 16th century they completely cease. Out of 70,000 recorded tombstones from about 3,300 sites, some 60,000 are in Bosnia and Herzegovina, about 4,400 in Croatia, about 3,500 in Montenegro and some 4,100 in Serbia. The elementary tombstone groups are the laid and the upright stone monoliths.

TEXT SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

Date released: June 16, 2017